Successfully Deploying AIOps, Part 2: Automating Problem Time

This is a copy of an original post on the AppDynamics blog here.



The Strategic Brief:

Built-in AI/ML—such as in AppDynamics APM—delivers value by activating the cognitive engine of AIOps to address anomalies.



Asian Clock 1

© 2017 Marco Coulter

In part one of our Successfully Deploying AIOps series, we identified how an anomaly breaks into two broad areas: problem time and solution time. The first phase in deploying AIOps focuses on reducing problem time, with some benefit in solution time as well. This simply requires turning on machine learning within an AIOps-powered APM solution. Existing operations processes will still be defining, selecting and implementing anomaly rectifications. When you automate problem time, solution time commences much sooner, significantly reducing an anomaly’s impact.

AIOps: Not Just for Production

Anomalies in test and quality assurance (QA) environments cost the enterprise time and resources. AIOps can deliver significant benefits here. Applying the anomaly resolution processes seen in production will assist developers navigating the deployment cycle.

Test and QA environments are expected to identify problems before production deployment. Agile and DevOps approaches have introduced rapid, automated building and testing of applications. Though mean time to resolution (MTTR) is commonly not measured in test and QA environments (which aren’t as critical as those supporting customers), the benefits to time and resources still pay off.

Beginning your deployment in test and QA environments allows a lower-risk, yet still valuable, introduction to AIOps. These pre-production environments have less business impact, as they are not visited by customers. Understanding performance changes between application updates is critical to successful deployment. Remember, as the test and QA environments will not have the production workload available, it’s best to recreate simulated workloads through synthetics testing.

With trust in AIOps built from first applying AIOps to mean time to detect (MTTD), mean time to know (MTTK) and mean time to verify (MTTV) in your test and QA environments, your next step will be to apply these benefits to production. Let’s analyze where you’ll find these initial benefits.

Apply AI/ML to Detection (MTTD)

An anomaly deviates from what is expected or normal. Detecting an anomaly requires a definition of “normal” and a monitoring of live, streaming metrics to see when they become abnormal. A crashing application is clearly an anomaly, as is one that responds poorly or inconsistently after an update.

With legacy monitoring tools, defining “normal” was no easy task. Manually setting thresholds required operations or SRE professionals to guesstimate thresholds for all metrics measured by applications, frameworks, containers, databases, operating systems, virtual machines, hypervisors and underlying storage.

AIOps removes the stress of threshold-setting by letting machine learning baseline your environment. AI/ML applies mathematical algorithms to different data features seeking correlations. With AppDynamics, for example, you simply run APM for a week. AppDynamics observes your application over time and creates baselines, with ML observing existing behavioral metrics and defining a range of normal behavior with time-based and contextual correlation. Time-based correlation removes alerts related to the normal flow of business—for example, the login spike that occurs each morning as the workday begins; or the Black Friday or Guanggun Jie traffic spikes driven by cultural events. Contextual correlation pairs metrics that track together, enabling anomaly identification and alerts later when the metrics don’t track together.

AIOps will define “normal” by letting built-in ML watch the application and automatically create a baseline. So again, install APM and let it run. If you have specific KPIs, you can add these on top of the automatic baselines as health rules. With baselines defining normal, AIOps will watch metric streams in real time, with the model tuned to identify anomalies in real time, too.

Apply AI/ML to Root Cause Analysis (MTTK)

The first step to legacy root cause analysis (RCA) is to recreate the timeline: When did the anomaly begin, and what significant events occurred afterward? You could search manually through error logs to uncover the time of the first error. This can be misleading, however, as sometimes the first error is an outcome, not a cause (e.g., a crash caused by a memory overrun is the result of a memory leak running for a period of time before the crash).

In the midst of an anomaly, multiple signifiers often will indicate fault. Logs will show screeds of errors caused by stress introduced by the fault, but fail to identify the underlying defect. The operational challenge is unpacking the layers of resultant faults to identify root cause. By pinpointing this cause, we can move onto identifying the required fix or reconfiguration to resolve the issue.

AIOps creates this anomaly timeline automatically. It observes data streams in real time and uses historical and contextual correlation to identify the anomaly’s origin, as well as any important state changes during the anomaly. Even with a complete timeline, it’s still a challenge to reduce the overall noise level. AIOps addresses this by correlating across domains to filter out symptoms from possible causes.

There’s a good reason why AIOps’ RCA output may not always identify a single cause. Trained AI/ML models do not always produce a zero or one outcome, but rather work in a world of probabilities or likelihoods. The output of a self-taught ML algorithm will be a percentage likelihood that the resulting classification is accurate. As more data is fed to the algorithm, these outcome percentages may change if new data makes a specific output classification more likely. Early snapshots may indicate a priority list of probable causes that later refine down to a single cause, as more data runs through the ML models.

RCA is one area where AI/ML delivers the most value, and the time spent on RCA is the mean time to know (MTTK). While operations is working on RCA, the anomaly is still impacting customers. The pressure to conclude RCA quickly is why war rooms get filled with every possible I-shaped professional (a deep expert in a particular silo of skills) in order to eliminate the noise and get to the signal.

Apply AI/ML to Verification

Mean time to verify (MTTV) is the remaining MTTR portion automated in phase one of an AIOps rollout. An anomaly concludes when the environment returns to normal, or even to a new normal. The same ML mechanisms used for detection will minimize MTTV, as baselines already provide the definition of normal you’re seeking to regain. ML models monitoring live ETL streams of metrics from all sources provide rapid identification when the status returns to normal and the anomaly is over.

Later in your rollout when AIOps is powering fully automated responses, this rapid observation and response is critical, as anomalies are resolved without human intervention.  Part three of this series will discuss connecting this visibility and insight to action.